Category: Psychology

Psychology is an academic discipline and social science that strives to understand unconscious and conscious behavior and mind of individuals and groups.

Psychologists explore different types of behavioral and mental processes, including perception, attention, cognition, emotion, intelligence and motivation. We also must not forget the examination of how personality and interpersonal relationships develop, as they are an important part of psychology.

On the practical individual level, psychology is all about making people’s life experience happier, more productive and fulfilling. It somehow includes more scientific, systematic and long‑term approaches of personal development to tackle bigger emotional challenges like depression, anxiety, isolation and procrastination.

Psychology (especially psychiatry) also deals with mental illnesses that are treated as serious medical conditions with a combination of medications, therapy and other techniques.

This category is a collection of psychology articles that discuss issues and solutions beyond the power of popular psychology and more superficial personal development tools; however, the articles don’t deal with issues that require medical attention (schizophrenia, chronic depression etc.), since I am not a doctor.

The articles present different types of psychological therapy (psychoanalysis, CBT, transactional analysis etc.), their tools and how they can be applied in personal life. If you are interested in psychology and different types of therapy, these category is the perfect choice for you.

How you negative mind is labeling and mislabeling yourself and other people

Negative labeling is one of the cognitive distortions. A child accidentally spills milk and the next thing s/he hears is “you’re so clumsy” or maybe even “you’re my clumsy little baby” with a kind, cynical voice. Then s/he hears it again and again and again, and soon s/he starts to believe that s/he really is clumsy. Every small ineptitude that happens later in the adult age makes the person feel horrible, enforcing the clumsiness label even further. There are two options when it comes to labeling yourself or others. A label might be complete fiction. Just a falsely installed belief that has nothing to do with reality. Or there really is some behavioral drawback present, but by labeling you make that one single behavior into a characteristic and apply it to the person as a whole. Both types of labeling (or name-calling) bring nothing but negative thoughts and energy in …

All-or-nothing thinking: It’s silly to expect you can have everything

The all-or-nothing mindset (also known as polarized thinking, dichotomous thinking or “black‑and‑white thinking”) is a common thinking error that turns you into a bitter perfectionist who gets emotionally irritated by the smallest deviations from unreachable expectations. Since your expectations are completely unrealistic, and then life happens, you are constantly irritated, bitter and depressed. With all-or-nothing thinking, any small imperfection turns your life into a big drama. Many times, you even tend to blame yourself for it. And during the day, many imperfections always do happen. How good can you feel then about yourself and life? Once you become aware of your all-or-nothing thinking patterns and how silly they are, you can finally breathe easier and calm down.

Fortunetelling, mind reading and jumping to conclusions

Jumping to conclusions is one of the most common forms of negative thinking. The problem with this type of a cognitive distortion (or cognitive bias) is that conclusions are in most cases negative; catastrophically negative. You usually jump to a negative conclusion without any justifiable facts of the situation or reality. In the next step, you start torturing yourself with how unlucky you are. The “Jumping-to-conclusions” mindset is like owning a crystal ball that predicts only misery. If you had such a crystal ball , what would you do with it? You would throw it immediately away, of course. So there is not a single reason to keep such a negative way of thinking in your mind.

How to become more assertive with a few simple exercises

People who are naturally assertive had their needs properly met when they were young. Thus, they developed a sense of trust, autonomy, initiative, industry, clear identity and great capacity for love. All that gives them the inner strength to go after their goals. But even if you aren’t naturally assertive, you have the power to change that. By developing healthy assertiveness, you’ll feel more confident, your relationships will improve, negative feelings will go away and you’ll feel much better and happier in general. You know that it’s better to live a single day as a lion than years as a sheep.

What is assertiveness and why you are not assertive enough

Looking at life from a psychological perspective, we can say that the point of existing is to satisfy the constant flow of your needs. In your lifetime, there’s a constant flow of new needs, and your mission is to make yourself happy by satisfying them. It’s that simple. Nevertheless, your needs must be met in a healthy and socially acceptable manner, in an absence of internal conflicts, which can often be challenging. That’s where healthy assertiveness comes into play. Unfortunately, healthy assertiveness is not as common as one would think. It actually takes quite a strong and emotionally sharp character to be assertive in a healthy way. You must trust in yourself and in the (highly probable) positive response that the environment will have to your need. You must be bold enough to act and go after your goals and desires, but on the other hand you must also respect …